Wednesday, 24 October 2012

Financial Managers - Are You Interested in a Financial Management Job?

Financial managers are present in about every industry and firm whether public or private, and they are responsible for preparing financial reports and managing the investment activities of the corporation. They may also go by the titles controller, credit manager, insurance manager, or finance officer.

Controllers are responsible for preparing financial reports and statements and earnings, and finance officers are responsible for managing the budget of the corporation. Credit managers are responsible for managing a corporation's credit and maintaining or improving a credit rating and determining debt ceilings.

Cash managers are responsible for controlling and monitoring the amount of cash that goes in and out of the business every month, and insurance managers are responsible for minimizing the risks that an individual or corporation will take during its business operations.

The most common areas of employment of financial managers are usually institutions such as banks and investment firms, and the role of finance management can be highly specialized in the case of larger institutions or cover most of a firm's operations in much smaller businesses.

Most financial managers will work in comfortable office settings working on new computers, and they may work long hours, which can include 60 hours a week. They may also have to travel in order to visit customers or clients. Managers will usually require a bachelor's degree in order to compete in competitive financial firms, although some first start out as loan officers and work their way up to a higher position.

In 2006, financial managers held over 500,000 jobs in America, with about 30% employed in the financial sector and the rest working for commercial businesses or Federal or state governments. Job prospects overall for financial managers will keep pace with the average rate of population growth in the country.

In 2006, financial managers in the middle fiftieth percentile of earnings made between $67,000 and $125,000. Larger firms will offer higher salaries and generous benefit packages, which can include stock bonuses and additional forms of compensation, while smaller firms will usually provide less in the way of benefits.

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